La Malinche

Known in her lifetime by many names, Malintzin would be recorded in history as the infamous La Malinche. Born into nobility and sold into slavery, from a young age Malintzin possessed a gift for language and diplomacy. In 1519, she was given to Hernán Cortés, the leader of the Spanish invading forces. When her translation skills were discovered, Cortés used her as his interpreter and, eventually, took her as his lover. Positioned as a vital go-between for the Spanish and indigenous peoples, her role is now seen as the decisive factor in the success of the Spanish mission in the “New World”.  Often cast as either the victim of the Spanish invaders or Cortés’s duplicitous ‘whore’, she has only recently started to be understood in the light of her historical reality. Journey with us to the temples of Tenochtitlan to witness an epic clash of civilisations, and discover La Malinche: scheming betrayer of her people to some, symbolic mother of the Mestizo race to others.

La Llorona

Along the rivers and waterways of Mexico, a woman’s cries can be heard in the night. Punished for the crime of infanticide, La Llorona wanders in the dark for eternity, ready to snatch away unsuspecting children. But while her story makes for perfect horror film fare, there is more to her than meets the eye. With echoes of the Aztec goddess Cihuacóatl, her significance as a symbol of women’s agency and power has been reclaimed in modern feminist reimaginings of La Llorona lore. So turn the lights down low as we prepare for a ghost story that reveals much more about prescribed gender roles than Hollywood would like us to think…

Irma González

In the rowdy wrestling arenas of Mexico City, there is a woman whose iconic status rivals that of the most famous of the male fighters. Luchadora Irma González grew up in the circus, but it didn’t take long before she found her way into the ring, and began travelling the world as a champion fighter, appearing on the silver screen and even pursuing a singing career. Come on and take your ring-side seats and prepare to get shouty as we delve into the amazing world of the women of lucha libre.

Leonora Carrington

From the north west of England to the heaving metropolis of Mexico City, Leonora Carrington defied convention. A celebrated Surrealist painter and a deeply inventive writer, Carrington’s personal life was just as colourful as her art. Join us as we follow her escape from stuffy English society, Nazi occupied France, and the asylum, to the vibrant and fantastical worlds of her imagination.